Multiple Marine Weather Alerts in Effect Until Friday

Waves break at Dorothea beach on St. Thomas on Friday. Powerful northerly and northeasterly swells have impacted the islands over the past week. (Source photo by Jesse Daley)
Waves break on the beach on Friday at Estate Dorothea on St. Thomas. Powerful northerly and northeasterly swells have impacted the islands over the past week. (Source photo by Jesse Daley)

The National Weather Service in San Juan, Puerto Rico, has issued multiple marine weather alerts that will be in effect for most of this week as strong swells will continue to impact the area.

“It cannot be overly emphasized that beach conditions on all beaches with north and northeast exposures will have unsafe conditions due to rip currents and high surf, and these beaches will, with few exceptions, continue to have hazardous conditions through the latter part of this week,” an update from the NWS on Sunday explained.

According to the NWS, waves could reach up to 11 feet, and there is a possibility of coastal flooding and beach erosion.

A “High Surf Advisory” has been issued for areas of northern Puerto Rico and the northern USVI. This alert will be in effect until at least 6 p.m. AST on Friday.

A “Small Craft Advisory” will be in effect for portions of the local waters around the USVI and Puerto Rico until at least 8 a.m. AST on Friday. Additionally, a “High Rip Current Risk” will be in effect through at least 6 p.m. AST on Friday.

Wave height forecast for 8 p.m. AST on Monday. Marine conditions will be hazardous throughout this week. (Image courtesy National Weather Service, San Juan)
The wave height forecast, in feet, for 8 p.m. AST on Monday. Marine conditions will be hazardous throughout this week. (Image courtesy National Weather Service, San Juan)

The USVI and parts of Puerto Rico have been affected by northerly and northeasterly swells throughout the past week. A major storm system in the central Atlantic contributed to rough seas last week, and the system had been monitored for tropical or subtropical development. However, the storm has since moved into the north Atlantic and cooler waters near the Azores islands, and it will not acquire tropical or subtropical characteristics.

Local weather updates will be posted to the Source Weather Page as they become available.